dysfunctional nonprofit boards

Dysfunctional Levels in Nonprofit Boards & Organizations.

 

id-100145240By: Eugene Fram        Free Digital Image

Viewer Favorite Updated and Revised

Article and studies from a Google search on “ Dysfunctions in Nonprofit Boards & Organizations,” yields 478,000 items in .69 of a second. These items show dysfunctions on charter school boards, church boards, healthcare boards, trade associations, etc.

These data can lead one to conclude that all nonprofit boards are dysfunctional. I suggest that nonprofit boards can generate a range of dysfunctional behavioral outcomes, but the staff can muddle through and continue to adequately serve clients. (more…)

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The Nonprofit Strategic Plan Is Finished—Tools to Move Forward!

The Nonprofit Strategic Plan Is Finished—Tools to Move Forward!

By Eugene Fram

The nonprofit’s 3 or 5-year strategic plan has been completed with the entire board management and staff reading from the same document. But what about the shoals that must be bridged before its benefits can be implemented? For example:

• How can the plan be kept in the forefront of board and management thinking as other problems, and crises must be resolved, opportunities addressed?
• The major of the committee that helped develop it will have rotated off the board in several years. What provision needs to be developed to fill the gap?
• Who will be the plan’s advocate should the CEO leave abruptly and the current board chair terms-out?

Following are my suggestions: (more…)

Dysfunctional Levels in Nonprofit Boards & Organizations.

Dysfunctional Levels in Nonprofit Boards & Organizations.

By: Eugene Fram

Article and studies from a Google search on “ Dysfunctions in Nonprofit Boards & Organizations,” yields 445,000 items in .32 of a second. These items show dysfunctions on charter school boards, church boards, healthcare boards, trade associations, etc.

Rick Moyers, a well-known nonprofit commentator and nonprofit researcher, concluded:

A decade’s worth of research suggests that board performance is at best uneven and at worst highly dysfunctional. ….. The experiences of serving on a board—unless it is high functioning, superbly led, supported by a skilled staff and working in a true partnership with the executive – is quite the opposite of engaging. (more…)

Why Are Dysfuctional Nonprofit Boards Interesting? Revised/Updated

Why Are Dysfunctional Nonprofit Boards Interesting?

By: Eugene H. Fram

My blog (http://bit.ly/yfRZpz) has been drawing an unusual number of views related to dysfunctional nonprofit boards.  Is it because:

  • Nonprofit evaluations have become a prime media interest?
  • Dodd-Frank passage has alerted a greater number of nonprofits to really review their charters?  
  • More boards have found board problems arising as a result of reviewing the expanded 990-form section on governance?
  • More audit committees are being given expanded responsibilities?  

Can a nonprofit organization focus on its mission vision and values if it has a dysfunctional nonprofit board?  I have seen this accomplished in situations where the CEO is managerially oriented and can live with the board’s problems or foibles.  For example, one nonprofit I encountered had an eleven person board, four of which never attended meetings and several others were sometimes absent for personal reasons.  Meeting minutes clearly showed a focus on operational detail. However a strong CEO was able to focus well, and the organization prospered. On the other hand,the CEO openly complained that she was overworked, needed board assistance and could become a “dictator” for the nonprofit!!

In another situation I encountered, the board chair and ED were very strong, but the board governmentally weak. Work and family pressures constrained the time directors could devote to their governance responsibilities. While the organization performed reasonably well, performance problems and board liability issues might arise, if either the chair or ED retired or resigned.
 

If you have any other insights as to why I am getting so many views related to dysfunctional nonprofits, I and other viewers would be delighted to have your comments.

 

 

 

 

Why Are Dysfunctional Nonprofit Boards Interesting?

Why Are Dysfunctional Nonprofit Boards Interesting?

By: Eugene H. Fram

My blog (http://bit.ly/yfRZpz) has been drawing an unusual number of views related to dysfunctional nonprofit boards.  Is it because:

  • Nonprofit evaluations has become a prime media interest?
  • Dodd-Frank passage has alerted a greater number of nonprofits to really review their charters?  
  • More boards have found board problems arising as a result of reviewing the expanded 990-form section on governance?
  • More audit committees are being given expanded responsibilities?  

Can a nonprofit organization focus on its mission vision and values if it has a dysfunctional nonprofit board?  I have seen this accomplished in situations where the CEO is managerially oriented and can live with the board’s problems or foibles.  For example, one nonprofit I encountered had an eleven person board, four of which never attended meetings and several others were sometimes absent for personal reasons.  Meeting minutes clearly showed a focus on operational detail. However a strong CEO was able to focus well, and the organization prospered. On the other hand,the CEO openly complained that she was overworked, needed board assistance and could become a “dictator” for the nonprofit!!

In another situation I encountered, the board chair and ED were very strong, but the board governmentally weak. Work and family pressures constrained the time directors could devote to their governance responsibilities. While the organization performed reasonably well, performance problems and board liability issues might arise, if either the chair or ED retired or resigned.
 

If you have any other insights as to why I am getting so many views related to dysfunctional nonprofits, I and other viewers would be delighted to have your comments.

 

 

 

 

In another situation I encountered, the board chair and ED were very strong, but the board governmentally weak. Work and family pressures constrained the time directors could devote to their governance responsibilities. While the organization performed reasonably well, performance problems and liability issues might suddenly occur, if either the chair or ED retired or resigned.