nonprofit fraud

Improve Your Nonprofit Director Onboarding Process

Improve Your Nonprofit Director Onboarding Process using Going For Impact

New guidebook covers

What to Know, Do and Not Do

As a veteran director with extensive experience on 12 nonprofit boards I have been “treated” to a wide variety of on-boarding sessions for new directors.

They’ve ranged from asking:

  • Every new director to read a 2.5 inch policy manual.  (I checked the size!)
  • Having experienced board members sit next to new ones at meetings.
  • Listening to the CEO review the entire policy manual.

Going For Impact: The Nonprofit Director’s Essential Guidebook lets you improve such sessions by making on-boarding governance material more meaningful and interesting. For example:

  • Use the book’s 150-item Index Strategically: Ask new directors to read specific topics (e.g., micromanaging; outcome vs. impact data; responsibilities of the board) and relate the readings to their new board.
  • Select Key Chapters in the Book: Choices include topics such as Nonprofit Culture Presents Challenges or There’s a Boundary Line That Shouldn’t Be Crossed. Then later – in either formal or informal sessions – have the CEO and/or board panels discuss the topics with the new directors.
  • Give All New Directors a Copy of the Book: Ask them to skim or read the book’s content, which encompasses 112 pages, and list topics of greatest interest.   Then hold three or four informal on-boarding sessions, led by experienced directors that relate to the selected topics.

Going for Impact can also be utilized by creative boards and CEOs to develop retreat agendas that can help enhance their board’s governance perspectives!

“Going for Impact” ©2016 https://goo.gl/Dwa9le

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Does the Nonprofit CEO Need to Go??

Recognizing and acknowledging that the current CEO is no longer helpful to the nonprofit organization is never easy to come by. Beyond malfeasance and under-performance, obvious reasons for initiating such a discussion, there are often other indicators: his/her modest leadership skills, ineffective discussions between the CEO and the board chair, criticism from external stakeholders, overemphasis on tactics unbalanced by a focus on strategies, etc. Volunteer directors are loathe to be confrontational when a CEO has been marginally satisfactory for a number of years, preferring to avoid the “drama” that inevitably accompanies the “changing of the guard.” Yet this type of change can’t be accomplished in a clear and pristine manner.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/eugene-fram/does-the-nonprofit-ceo-ne_b_5019360.html

Nonprofit Fraud Robs Charities of Substantial Dollars

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/eugene-fram/nonprofit-fraud-robs-char_b_4276111.html

“According to a Washington Post analysis of the filings from 2008-2012 … of more than 1,000 nonprofit organizations, … there was a significant diversion of nonprofit assets, disclosing losses attributed to theft, investment frauds, embezzlement and other unauthorized uses of funds.” The top 20 organizations in the Post’s analysis had a combined potential total loss of more than a half-billion dollars. One estimate, by Harvard University’s Houser Center for Nonprofit Organizations, suggests that fraud losses among U.S. nonprofits are approximately $40 billion a year.

Nonprofit Directors/Trustees Alert: Volunteer Chairman Held Liable for Nonprofit’s Unpaid Payroll Taxes – Updated and Revised

Following is a blog-post that I strongly suggest that you, your colleagues and friends associated with nonprofit or trustee organizations read carefully. As you read it, please keep the material below the link in mind.

http://www.mercadien.com/PDF/Volunteer_Chairman_Held_Liable_for_Nonprofits_unpaid_payroll_taxes.pdf

I think the situation presented above is more common than most directors/trustees think. As a layperson, I am surprised that the court did not spread the fine among all the directors.
The chairman was clearly trying to support a nonprofit in trouble. Perhaps he was so dedicated to the mission that he was trying to do everything possible to save it? Not Shown here is the fact that, “[T]he chairman is burdened with proving that they (the IRS) are not correct. … The law does not require the individual to have complete control over the finances, only what the court calls significant control.” (more…)

Will New York Lead the Way In Changing Nonprofits?

Will New York Lead the Way In Changing Nonprofits?

By: Eugene Fram

In January, Governor Andrew Como place a salary state funded cap of $199,000 for nonprofit executives at (more…)

Assessing Nonprofit CEO Performance

Assessing Nonprofit CEO Performance

By Eugene Fram

CEO assessment should be very thorough and take place annually.  That doesn’t mean that it always has to take place at one time.  In some situations, assessment occurs throughout the year, depending on how the committee members decide to divide their tasks.

After completing the entire review, the assessment committee should make its report to the full board.   If the review takes place periodically throughout the year, board updates follow a similar pattern.
(more…)