Organizational development

Practical suggestions to improve nonprofit boards’ outcomes and impacts.

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Do any of these describe you or your nonprofit board members?

·         Don’t have a way to effectively measure “client impact.”

·         Must build CEO/board fundraising capacity.

·         Have trustees who “micromanage” management.

·         Never get to strategic discussions. Focus is strictly operations.

·         Need a broad framework that separates policy & strategy development from operational activities.

·         Have a board/staff relationship that isn’t built on trust.

·         Need task forces that deliver more effective, timely results.

These books can help!    Please share this email with others who can benefit!
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Eugene Fram, Ed.D, Professor Emeritus

frameugene@gmail.com

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Can Nonprofit Boards Suffer From Agenda Deficits?

Can Nonprofit Boards Suffer From Agenda Deficits?

By Eugene Fram

Revised & Updated Viewer Favorite

In a recent study of 772 for-profit and nonprofit directors from around the world, McKinsey & Company found that 25% of the sample assessed their board impact as moderate or low, “… while others reported having a high impact across board functions. “ http://bit.ly/1iFEINR

Following, in italics, are brief abstracts from the study, followed by my analysis of the importance of the information to nonprofit boards. (more…)

When Will Nonprofit Boards Learn to Plan for Succession?

When Will Nonprofit Boards Learn to Plan for Succession?

By: Eugene Fram

Revised & Updated Viewer Favorite

The CEO has resigned with two weeks notice. Whatever the scenario, the pace of the organization will likely slow. Some senior managers may vie for the position or, in self-interest begin to look for new positions, as insurance. Staff members begin to speculate about the future of their department and their positions.

A search committee is cobbled together to explore possibilities for a replacement. According to a recent study, such turmoil is not unusual among nonprofits in transition periods. (more…)