meaningfully involved board members

Major Donor Has Remorse–Nonprofit Board/CEO Failed to Meaningfully Engage Him?

 

 

Major Donor Has Remorse–Nonprofit Board/CEO Failed to Meaningfully Engage Him?

By: Eugene Fram

After the gift is received, announced and celebrated, where does a nonprofit board and its management go from there? And whose job is it to see that the donor remains engaged and involved in the organization? These are questions that I have been thinking about after a friend brought facts of his donor experience to my attention. (more…)

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Retaining Excellent Nonprofit Board Members by Keeping Them Meaningfully Involved – Part II

Retaining Excellent Nonprofit Board Members by Keeping Them Meaningfully Involved – Part II

By: Eugene Fram

Board members will stay interested and involved in their nonprofit organizations if they are convinced that their activities have a purpose and serve the organization. This is what I call meaningful involvement. And as a side note, being pertinent and time-limited is especially applicable for younger individuals building a career, only because this group is now used to immediate gratification and to projects that last no longer than the equivalent of a semester. When board members feel their involvement is meaningful, they will often remark, “Assignments are interesting and well organized.”

Following are some hypothetical examples: of meaningful involvement: (more…)

Retaining Excellent Nonprofit Board Members by Keeping Them Meaningfully Involved – Part I

Retaining Excellent Nonprofit Board Members by Keeping Them Meaningfully Involved – Part I

By: Eugene Fram

In the 20th century, it was not unusual for nonprofit boards to grapple with operational questions related to buying new equipment, firing a custodian, hiring a new program director, choosing new furniture for the reception area, revising budget forms, revamping the accounting department, etc.

In order to retain desirable directors in the 21st century, the board only needs to be generally aware of these types of operational decisions, not make them, and then needs to focus its meeting times on questions such as: (more…)